ISP TECHNOLOGIES

ISP Technologies

ISPCare™

ISPCare

Have a question about your ISP gear?
Phone: (248) 673-7790
e-mail: tech@isptechnologies.com

Frequently Asked Questions
- Where can I find product manuals?
Where do I register for my warranty?
Where can I find a local product dealer?
What’s the difference between the Decimator and the Decimator G-String?
Is it possible to change the channels on the THETA Pre Amp Pedal with pedals g-lab gsc3?
Can the Decimator Pro Rack G unit run in mono?
Can I use the Theta Pre Amp Pedal at low volume?

 

See what other customers have asked about ISP gear:

BETA BASS PREAMP

Question:
Is there a particular footswitch I should use with the Beta Bass Preamp to turn the compressor / exciter on and off? Do I need a double or could it work with a single footswitch?

Answer:
You can use any of the standard latching switches that are sold at all of the guitar stores to switch channels on your amplifier.  If you want to control both functions on the Beta Bass you will need a dual switch.

 

DECIMATOR G STRING

Question:
I’m trying to use the decimator in the effects loop and in front of the amp. I’m using a Peavey 6505+ amp. When engaging the effects loop on the Peavey pedal, with the Decimator on, the amp is silent. When engaging the lead channel of the amp, I get a hiss that won’t go away, no matter how much I turn up the Decimator G String. The amplifier is set at low volume, around 2 on the master.

Answer:
I am not clear which Peavey amp you are using.  It sounds like the effects loop is a parallel loop and not a series loop.  In a series loop all of the signal will pass through the loop and the Decimator needs a series loop to work correctly.  You can try this test.  Turn on the loop on the amplifier and plug a cord into send and return and leave the other end of the cord open (don’t connect the other end of these two cords to anything).  If the amp has a series loop you won’t get any sound through the amp since all of the signal is going through the loop and there is no connection between the send and return.  If you get a signal then the loop is a parallel loop.  Some amps allow you to switch between series and parallel so you can check you manual to confirm.  If the amp has a parallel loop then you can still use the G-String with the pedals by inserting the pedals between the Guitar OUT and Decimator IN on the G-String and connect the Decimator OUT to the input of the amp.

 

Question:
What is the difference between the Decimator and the Decimator G String?

Answer:
The difference between the two pedals is to understand the technology. Inside the pedal the guitar signal splits off into two signal paths. One path feeds a detector circuit that converts the dynamics of the guitar signal into what we call a control voltage. This control voltage is fed to a voltage controlled amplifier  (VCA) which is the second path in the pedal. The standard Decimator has these inputs of both paths tied together for one input and the output is the output of the VCA. This keeps it simple and cost effective. On the G String, for end users that require more precise triggering of the technology ie: high gain setups , we split the two signal paths apart from each other, hence the four 1/4″ ph jacks. The jacks labeled Guitar In and Guitar Out is the input of the detector. The intention is to have the guitar connected directly to the Guitar In to feed the detector directly with your dry guitar signal dynamics. The Guitar Out will connect to the front end of your pedal board or to the input of the amp. This is a consistent signal source for the detector to trigger off of. The other two jacks (Dec In and Dec Out) is the path where the VCA is located. This is the path where you’ll get the noise reduction. This path can be located after your noisiest dynamic changing pedal such as compressors, boosters, overdrives and distortion pedals. If the lead channel in the amp is the source of your noise, then the Dec In Dec out path of the G String can be inserted into the send and return of your series fx loop on the back of the amp. Because the Decimator acts like an automatic volume control, we recommend inserting it just ahead of any delay or reverb fx.

 

Question:
Which Decimator pedal will serve me best? I have 2 pedal boards with two separate power pedals for each board. The first board has all my drive pedals, fuzzes and wah. It goes Guitar > drive pedals > amp in. The second board has all my modulation pedals like delay, chorus, tremolo, phaser. It goes Fx loop send > modulation pedals > fx loop return.

I was wondering if I could use the G-String II like this:
First: Guitar > Drive pedals > Decimator Guitar In > Decimator Guitar Out to Amp input
Then: Fx Loop Send > Modulation pedals > Decimator Dec In, then Decimator Dec Out to Fx Loop Return

Answer:
I would recommend the G String because it will have better performance but you want to go direct from the Guitar to the Guitar IN on the Decimator G and then go from Guitar OUT to your gain pedals.  This will allow the Decimator to track the guitar directly.  You can then insert the Decimator IN to the send jack and put any kind of Reverb and or Delay between the Decimator OUT and the return jack in the loop.  This will allow the verb and delay to trail off in the background and eliminate the noise in the chain.  If you have any ground loop problems you simply need to remove the ground on one end of your cables that go to the Decimator IN and Decimator OUT.  Some companies offer ground lift cables so you can make or buy them.

 

Question:
I’ve got a Decimator G-String 1st version.  My amplifier is a Fender DeLuxe Reverb reissue, which doesn’t have Fx loops ; so, I wonder if there’s a better way to connect G-String to avoid cutting off delays and reverbs’tail . Normally, the signal chain is: guitar in Guitar In, then Guitar Out to first drive pedal, then modulation pedals, delay, reverb and reverb out in Dec IN . Finally, Dec OUT to the amp. Is my rig correct ?

Answer:
You are  correct on the connections the only thing you can do is put your reverb and or delay between the Decimator OUT and the input of the amplifier this will avoid cutting of echo and reverb tails after you stop playing. Most of the noise comes from any gain pedals you use so this should not make the noise problem too bad.

 

Question:
I recently purchased a ISP G String Decimator because my Boss NS2 significantly decreased dynamic on my clean channel. I have a 5150 original head and usually have had a signal path that goes something like; TC Polytune, Crybaby from Hell, Line FM4, Maxon OD808, Wampler Triple Wreck, NS2 (now the G String), TC Dreamscape Chorus, TC Hall of Fame Reverb, Eventide Timefactor, Mission Volume Pedal.

Could I run the G String as I did the NS2 in the front of the amp? Should it go before the tuner as to track the guitar better? Should it be in the loop?

Answer:
You can set up a loop with the Decimator G String as follows: Plug your guitar directly into the Guitar IN. Insert your pedals between Guitar OUT and Decimator IN. Guitar OUT to the first pedal in and then your last pedal out to the Decimator IN. Then plug the Decimator OUT into your guitar amp. This will put your gain pedals in a loop of the Decimator and it will remove all of the gain noise from these pedals.

 

DECIMATOR PRO RACK G

Question:
Where do I place my pedals in the chain with an Decimator Pro Rack G?

Answer:
You want to have the direct guitar output go to the input of channel 1.  We need to see the un-altered direct guitar signal for the Decimator to track correctly.  Then go from the output of channel 1 to your pedals and then to your preamp or amp.  If you are using a preamp go from the preamp out to the Decimator channel 2 input then to the power amp.  If you have a guitar amp then go pedals to the input of the amp and put the Decimator channel 2 in the effects loop.  If you add any echo or reverb you want these after the output of the Decimator channel 2 so you don’t cut off any reverb or echo tails.

 

Question:
Can the Decimator Pro Rack G unit run in mono?

Answer:
You can simply insert a jumper between Guitar OUT and the input of Channel 1 and the unit will work just like the ProRack G.  Then re-patch when you need true stereo operation.

 

Question:
Is it possible to power the Decimator Pro Rack G with a MXR MC-403 Power System? The noise gate needs 900mA AC but the MXR just provides 800mA AC. Would it be possible to use these two units together or would it cause some trouble?

Answer:
The Pro Rack G will pull about 800 milliamps of current so it will be very close.  This could cause the MXR power supply to overheat since there will not be any headroom.  I would recommend you use a minimum 1000 milliamp supply or greater to avoid pulling the maximum current from the supply and overheating the supply.

 

Question:
I need to replace the power supply adaptor on my ProRack G. Will any9V 1 amp power supply work or do I need something that is specialized?

Answer:
We ship the units with a 1.5 amp 9VAC adaptor so as to avoid overheating a smaller adaptor.  The unit will pull approx 600 milliamps and a 1AMP adaptor should be fine but, for long term reliability, we use the 1.5 amp adaptor.

 

Question:
I’ve just got myself a Decimator Pro Rack G and I LOVE IT! Great unit! The only snag I’ve hit is the power adapter seems too big to fit between a single rack space in to my power conditioner.  I DO already have a Visual Sound 1Spot adapter (plus the little adapter plug that allows it to plug into any line 6 stompbox/Decimator) that seems to fit perfectly between two rack units on the back. I haven’t actually tried it because I don’t want to fry my Decimator.  I’ve read that it draws roughly 800ma. The 1Spot is 1700ma. Do you think it would work? If not, do you guys know of an alternative way to make it work? I’m trying to use a small rack right now.  Thanks for your time!

Answer:
Please note the Decimator ProRack G is powered with a 9 volt AC adapter not 9 volt DC, so, if the One Spot adapter is 9 volt AC output at 1700 milli-amps you will be fine. We ship a 2000 or 3000 milli-amp adapter with the unit which helps ensure a long life for the power adapter. Since the unit pulls about 800 milli-amps, you want to go over by at least 50% to avoid overheating the adapter, which will cause failure.

 

Question:
How do I hook my delay pedal into the effects loop channels of my Decimator Pro Rack G?

Answer:
You typically want to put any gain pedals, overdrive, compression between the output of the channel 1 of the Decimator and the input of channel 2. This will make a loop for your gain pedals but both channels of the ProRack G will track the direct guitar input.  I would then put the delay pedal between the output of channel 2 and the input of your amp or you can put it in the effects loop of the amp.  This way when you stop playing the echo will trail off in the background and will not get cutoff by the Decimator.

 

IMPRESSION PEDAL

Question:
Does the Impression use 200mA or 2,000mA?

Answer:
The Impression pedal will consume or use 200 milliamps of current at 9 volts AC.  If we shipped the pedal with a 9VAC adaptor that could only source 200 milliamps the adaptor would fail after a short period of time since it would overheat since it would be sourcing its maximum current rating at all times.  We ship the unit with a 9VAC power adaptor rated to supply a maximum of 2000 milliamps, which means the adaptor is oversized for the actual continuous load.  This means the power adaptor will run very cool and should last forever since it is sourcing about 10% of the rated maximum load current.

 

THETA PREAMP PEDAL

Question:
Can the Theta PreAmp pedal go direct to the mixing console without an amp in line for live use?  Or is an amp required?

Answer:
You can go direct into a mixer without an amp since it is a line level output.  It does not have a speaker simulated output so you may want to roll off the HF on the mixer to get a better speaker simulated sound but it will work direct into a mixer.

 

Question:
Is it possible to change the channels on the THETA Pre Amp Pedal with pedals g-lab gsc3?

Answer:
The THETA has two jacks on the back that allow the unit to switch between GAIN 1 and GAIN 2 and also allows you to switch PREAMP ON / OFF and DISTORTION ON / OFF.  You need to control these with switch closure.  Many MIDI controllers offer MIDI control functions to control channel switch functions, this is the same control needed to switch the THETA preamp functions I describe above.

 

Question:
I have a JCM 800 Bass Series which does not have an effects loop. Can the Theta PreAmp Pedal be used like a stomp box through the front end of an amp? Will it sound as good as it would through the power amp section?

Answer:
You can use the THETA preamp pedal into the front end of an amplifier without any problem.  You just want to set the amp for clean and without any EQ if possible.

 

Question:
If I want to use the Theta preamp at low volume at home (with a stealth power amp), can I use it with an attenuator (such as the Dr Z Air Brake)?

Answer:
Yes, you can use a power attenuator or you can just turn down the volume on the Stealth but an attenuator will not hurt the Stealth.

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